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CNC Trimming

Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines are automated milling devices that make industrial components without direct human assistance. They use coded instructions that are sent to an internal computer, which allows factories to fabricate parts accurately and quickly. There are many different types of CNC machines, ranging from drills to plasma cutters, so they can be used to make a wide variety of parts.

The code used to program CNC units is generically called G-Code. It contains information about where parts of the machine should be positioned, and tells the machine exactly where to place a tool. Other instructions tell the machine additional details, like the speed a part should run at; how deep it should cut, burn, or punch; and the angle of an automated tool. Most modern industrial CNC machines are tied into a network of computers, and receive operating and tooling instructions via a software file.

In an industrial setting, CNC machines can be combined into entire cells of tooling machines that can operate independently of each other. They are often driven by completely digital designs, which eliminates the need for design blueprints to be physically drawn up. Many are capable of running for several days without human intervention. In fact, some are so sophisticated that they can contact the operator’s cell phone and send an alert if a malfunction occurs. These automated features make it possible to produce thousands of parts with minimal supervision, and free the operator to perform other tasks.

Kintz can form parts with a level of precision that is nearly impossible using older tools. Without CNC, workers must control different tools by hand, and errors are common, but a machine can perform the same task without becoming tired, and can work non-stop. This saves a lot of time, and the improved accuracy can help eliminate waste, since there are less faulty parts that have to be thrown away.